The Futurama FU-3 (part 3)

For more aluminium welding practice I decided to weld up the knob holes in the original Corvette front panel. The front looks OK but you don’t want to see the other side. I then made a new layout using MAD- permanent Marker Aided Design.

Next step was to finish wiring up the Marshall 2204 preamp.

See earlier posts on the Ninja Corvette Hybrid if you’re puzzled by all the extra transistor stuff.

Yeah it makes the master volume Marshall racket πŸ˜€ This was recorded at the 1W power output setting.

Got some matching knobs from Thonk. I will get round to making a completely new panel one day using the MAD one as a template.

The Futurama FU-3 (part 2)

With the chassis suitably butchered it was time to start on the electronics. I used Mark Huss’s schematic as a guide.

Soon the phase inverter and power amp were finished and working.

One big difference is that the 2204 uses negative feedback around the output stage while the original Corvette didn’t. So I decided to go with the NFB, and include the transistor output stage in the feedback loop too for an extra challenge.

It was perfectly stable first time! LOL just kidding… It suffered from high frequency parasitics-

And these comically chaotic LF oscillations could be provoked by overdriving it at low frequencies.

After much trial and error I ended up with something like this. The 0.68uF/5 ohm RC snubber killed the HF oscillations, and removing C17 and C18 (this schematic) stopped the motorboating. With these values it was just barely stable with the load disconnected and a 220k NFB resistor (vs 100k in the original 2203 circuit)

Note that when the transistor output stage is in play, the OPT secondary becomes bootstrapped and flies around with the speaker output, so the NFB takeoff point I used sees the output voltage of the transistor stage plus the output voltage of the valve OPT.

Removing C17 and C18 demanded quite a lot of extra current from the bias generator, but it seemed to deliver it no problem, so no changes were required there.

Resistor values were also changed to reduce the current gain of the transistor output stage, due to the increased output of the valve part of the circuit.

The Futurama FU-3 (part 1)

I got bored of the Ninja Corvette Hybrid and decided to transform it into something with a little more “FU”.

The plan I came up with was to strip out the valve part of the circuit and replace it with a clone of a Marshall 2204. This is a classic rock amp that I hadn’t had much experience with.

I decided to use 6AQ5 power tubes running off 250V, for a modest apartment-friendly power output. The 3 position power switching would be retained, giving power levels of 1W, 10W and 40W.

The Marshall 2204 circuit has 5 valves, but there are only 2 holes in the chassis…

A new output transformer was also required, as the original one was single-ended. I used the cheapest PP one I could find at TAD. I also TIG welded a bracket for it, as I’ve been watching way too much Project Binky.

Tiggy Weldrix Wah Pedal

I got fed up with the thumb controls on the torch that came with my welder and decided to try a foot pedal. They are extremely expensive to buy so I decided to make one out of an unwanted wah pedal.

First, a bracket πŸ™‚

The main difference between a wah pedal and a TIG foot pedal is that the switch engages as you first apply pressure to the pedal, telling the welder to open the gas valve and go through its preflow and ignition cycle. Depressing the pedal further then controls the welding current.

To allow this operating mode I threw away the existing stomp switch and replaced it with a microswitch operated by a cam.

The other difference is that it needs a rather strong return spring to avoid igniting the welder by accident. I found this out by trial and error. D: Keeping with the musical instrument theme, I used some Strat tremolo springs from eBay.

I connected it to the socket for the hand controller as a spare plug for this was supplied with the welder. It thinks it is a torch with 1 button and thumbwheel. This seems to work fine, but I will try the foot pedal socket if I ever get round to figuring out the mating plug for it.

And the bead goes on…

Arc Attack x Tesla Fuzz

I built the Tesla Fuzz especially for a collaboration between Arc Attack and some talented metal guitarists. And here they are!

Joe DiPrima and Gabriel Guardian explain how it works

Alex Campbell of Seek Irony performs some neoclassical shredding that makes the Tesla coil sound almost good.
Thunderstruck is on every Tesla guitarist’s set list. πŸ˜‰

Extra Coneage

8″ speakers never really did anything for me, so I decided to wedge a 10″ into the Ninja Corvette.

It was just possible by carefully chiselling away parts of the cabinet.

It sounds a lot better than the 8″. Unfortunately I have no idea how to make a good grill for it now!

Resampling in Mac OS part 2 :)

After a few snarky messages from Mac owners, I thought I had better post a follow-up. I experimented a little at the weekend and found the following:

If I leave my soundcard (Audiophile Firewire) permanently on 96kHz, then:

iTunes will resample to 96kHz internally, with quality that sounds just fine.

VLC will output at whatever the sample rate of the media is, and get resampled to 96k by AUHAL on its default quality setting, which sounds a bit sketchy.

But, VLC can be set to always output at a particular rate, resampling internally. There’s an option called “Frequency” in the advanced audio preferences. According to VLC’s debug stream, it uses a module called “bandlimited_resampler”, and that’s encouraging, because it suggests that the guy who coded it knows the word “bandlimited”. It uses about 6% CPU time, and again, sounds fine. Thanks to the wonders of open source, we can see bandlimited.h here! Ooo, a 1536 point sinc kernel with linear interpolation and single-precision floating point arithmetic.

I got VLC’s “Media Library” to work too, so it can store a playlist, remembering what FLAC stuff I have and the track order of it.

I’ve not tried to play DVDs yet, but hopefully the computer won’t catch fire.

So in conclusion, I’m upgrading this from “:(” to “:)”

Resampling in Mac OS :(

Recently I’ve been experimenting with higher definition music downloads. For example, the Studio Masters recordings from Linn Records, or the material from B&W Society Of Sound. Everything went nicely until I got my new Mac.

First of all, the only lossless format supported by iTunes is Apple Lossless. It won’t play FLAC (the open source Free Lossless Audio Codec) properly, even with the xiph.org extensions, Fluke, or whatever. A bummer, as I already had a fair amount of music in FLAC format. Sure, VLC will play it, but VLC can’t understand iTunes playlists.

Second, Linn don’t support Apple Lossless. They supply their music in FLAC and WMA formats only. I guess they’d rather you bought their own stupid, overpriced DS network media players, even if you have a Mac already.

Third, Mac OS resamples! Windows was smart enough (or dumb enough?) to set your audio hardware to the actual sample rate and bit depth of the track that was currently playing. Or at least the setup I used, Winamp Classic with the ASIO driver, would do that, guaranteeing bit-accurate output under all conditions.

The Mac doesn’t. You set the sample rate and bit depth once and for all in the audio control panel, and all the sound gets resampled to that. You can play 96kHz material till you’re blue in the face, using any player application you like, but if the system sample rate is set to 44.1, it’ll get downsampled. Watch a DVD, and the sound is getting resampled from 48 to 44.1.

I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t trust any resampling algorithm I hadn’t written or at least tested myself. They’re notoriously hard to get right. And a “right” one consumes so much CPU power that there’s a real incentive to downgrade the performance deliberately.

Here’s the official line from the Coreaudio mailing list, found here

This was a comment posed to the list (which was replayed verbatim from Benchmark’s Elias Gwinn)
> […] If the user changes CoreAudio’s sample-rate in AudioMIDI Setup to something different than what iTunes is locked to, CoreAudio will convert the sample rate of the audio that it is receiving from iTunes. In this case, the audio may be undergoing two levels of sample-rate conversion (once by iTunes and once by CoreAudio). (The SRC in iTunes is of very high quality (virtually inaudible), but the SRC in CoreAudio is horrible and will cause significant distortion.) If the user wants to change the sample rate of CoreAudio, iTunes should be restarted so that it can lock to the correct sample rate.

This is the response from an Apple employee:
iTunes uses the AudioConverter API internally but we set the quality to “max” and AUHAL probably uses the default (I don’t know). One SRC at max quality followed by one at the default quality is not so great when analyzing sine tone playback.

So the bottom line seems to be, that if you have material recorded at a higher sample rate than 44.1, then you need to turn your system’s sample rate up to appreciate it. And if you do that, then all of your other stuff will get upsampled, though at least it uses Coreaudio’s best quality algorithm. Or does it? Leopard introduced a new “Mastering grade” algorithm, and it’s not obvious whether that one is used.

One step forward, two back. Come on Apple, twiddle those nose rings and come up with a sexy solution.

To EQ or not to EQ, that is the Q

If you’re a follower of hi-fi trends, you might have noticed that tone controls don’t seem to be cool any more. High-end amplifiers have become very minimal, with only a volume control and power switch.

Well, there’s high end and high end. Richard Burwen’s system would certainly qualify as high-end by almost any definition, if only because of its 20,000 watts of amplification, 169 speakers, and 34 channels of active crossover and EQ, which Burwen claims to have spent a year adjusting by ear for a flat overall frequency response. In other words, the very opposite of a minimal system.

Moving on to my own hi-fi system, which has 60 watts of amplification, 2 speakers, and no tone controls or EQ whatsoever, and has been plagued by annoying room modes. I’ve tried several different speakers, but the bass on all of them just sounded terrible in there.

Recently, I realised that the fundamental problem is that my living room has the two large opposing walls made of solid brick. These two reflective surfaces allow a standing wave to develop between them, and the result is a highly resonant bass boost of about 9dB at 60Hz. I fed the measurements of the room into an online room mode calculator, and it agrees that I should get terrible bass.

So, what to do about it? The minimal solution would be to damp the resonance by installing bass traps. This would be a major carpentry project, though, and good bass traps have to be physically large, so I would lose space in the room. And, I hate working with rockwool, it makes me itch all over.

So, like Richard Burwen, I decided to install an EQ, and “tune by ear for flat frequency response”. My first attempt was with an Alesis PEQ-450, which is a 10-band digital parametric EQ. It only took about 5 minutes to find the offending frequency and notch it out, and I was amazed by the improvement. I found myself getting out those old hip-hop and drum’n’bass CDs that had just sounded offensive on the system before.

However, I wasn’t too happy with the sound quality of the PEQ-450. Maybe I was imagining it, but I felt that it grunged up the treble somewhat. It was also too big and I had nowhere to install it. I ended up buying two (they’re mono) Presonus EQ3Bs on Ebay, and again, tuned them by ear for best bass. I could have gone digital with a Behringer DEQ2496, but in the end, I decided that the simpler solution would be better.

So now, I find myself in the situation of committing audio sacrilege (tone controls are bad! So EQ must be worse!) in order to get a major improvement in the performance of my audio system. Mmm, sacred cowburger.

EQ

The EQ3Bs in place

The system

The system. The graffiti paintings are by my brother, and help to break up standing waves too. πŸ™‚

Goodbye decks…

Lack of DJ skillz and impending middle age forces sale! ;-(

There’s a story behind me and decks, which I can tell now that the 10 year non-disclosure agreement has expired. In my final year at university, I took the “Innovation For Engineers” class, which taught how to be an entrepreneur. Myself and another student, Andy Williams, decided that we would have a go at entrepreneurship for real. Andy knew I was a mad inventor, and he lent me money to develop one of my inventions, in exchange for half of the profits. (lesson 1 in entrepreneurship: never give anyone half of the profits)

The invention I chose was an improved crossfader for DJ mixers. I’d just fixed a DJ mixer for a friend, his crossfader had worn out, and I thought I could invent one that would last for ever. I soon had a prototype together, and we took it to music industry trade shows in Manchester and London to attract interest. The first interest we got was “Company G” who offered us Β£10k to bury the thing, a la everlasting lightbulb. (In hindsight we should have taken that.)

After a lot of board treading, we got the attention of “Company N” who agreed to buy the invention off us and fund the patent. Enter endless messing around with contract and patent lawyers. All went well until a substantive patent search found that I had reinvented a mechanism first patented by RCA in the 1970s. Game over! We walked away with Β£5k each, after a year’s work, for a net hourly rate comparable to flipping burgers. But it was certainly an interesting experience.

Company N launched the new fader anyway, in their Pro SM-3 mixer. Sales were so-so and the model was discontinued after a while, the company choosing to get out of analog mixers altogether and go to a digital solution.

Fast forward to 2 years ago, when I finally decided to buy some decks of my own. I bought a second-hand pair of Technics 1200s, only to discover to my surprise that I’m a crap DJ! I can match beats, but I can’t be bothered shopping for records, and have no idea what sort of records I’d want to buy anyway. And if I ever do buy any, I can’t remember the right places to mix them into each other.

The decks had their finest hour at my 30th birthday party, where I persuaded a friend of a friend to come and spin drum’n’bass on them. My flat was well and truly rinsin’! Unfortunately the rest of us got completely drunk, kicked him off the decks and started to play Blondie. He didn’t drink, and left in the huff. The party was still going at dawn the next day. Sorry, Chris.

Now I think it’s time to move on. Feel free toΒ bid on my decks on Ebay!Β πŸ™‚

decks for sale!